Members

Prof. Angela Carbone, University of Bari – Aldo Moro.
Collaborator of the Other Sister’s Project.

Angela Carbone is Associate Professor of early modern History at the Department of Education, Psychology, Communication of the University of Bari Aldo Moro. Her main areas of research are: family; gender history; charity and assistance. Among her list of publications are: Esposti e orfani nella Puglia dell’Ottocento (Cacucci Editore, 2000); Vita nei Sassi. Famiglia, infanzia e assistenza a Matera in età moderna (Cacucci Editore, 2005); Ritirate dalle cose del mondo. Donne e istituzioni nel Mezzogiorno moderno (Guida Editori, 2020). 

For the Other Sister project, Prof. Carbone aims to work on non-cloistered women in early modern Southern Italy and Mediterranean (Puglia, Basilicata, Calabria, Malta). Using the rich and unexplored archival sources, her new researches will interest different female figures: monache di casaconverserepentant women.   

Prof. Isabelle Cochelin, Department of History, University of Toronto.
Principal Investigator of the Other Sister’s Project.

Isabelle Cochelin is Associate Professor of Medieval History at the Department of History and the Centre for Medieval Studies of the University of Toronto. After an MA on a female recluse (Juette/Yvette of Huy 1158-1228), she has worked almost exclusively on monks (8th-12th cent.) for the last thirty-three years: their daily lifeoblationnovitiatespaceshierarchyservants, etc., first and foremost using and pondering upon monastic customaries. After years of teaching the history of medieval monasticism, she became convinced, however, that much more should be done on non-cloistered religious women.

For the Other Sister project, Prof. Cochelin plans to work on the non-cloistered religious women working in hospitals and the secular canonesses. Her researches will take into consideration both the medieval and early modern period.

Dr. Sylvie Duval, University Cattolica in Milan/CIHAM (Lyon).
Collaborator of the Other Sister’s Project.

Sylvie Duval is an associate scholar at the Università Cattolica in Milan (Italy) and at the CIHAM (Lyon, France). She is a specialist of the history of medieval religious women, and in particular of the Observance Movement. Among her publications are: “Comme des anges sur terre”: les moniales dominicaines et les débuts de la réforme observante, 1385-1461. (École Française de Rome, 2015), and La beata Chiara conduttrice: le vite di Chiara Gambacorta e Maria Mancini e i testi dell’Osservanza domenicana pisana. (Edizioni di storia e letteratura, 2016).

For the Other Sister project, Dr. Duval will firstly focus on the city of Milan, where medieval semi-religious women were extremely numerous. Generally assimilated to the humiliate, they did not belong however to the Order of the Humiliates. Most of them were incorporated into the Dominican or Clarissan orders during the Fifteenth century. As a second case-study, Dr. Duval will look over some communities of oblate related to hospitals. Duval will compare the cases of the Florentine oblates of the Hospital of Santa Maria Nuova, and of the Parisian “Haudriettes” or “Bonnes femmes”.

Emma Gabe, Center for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto.
Member and research assistant of the Other Sister’s Project.

Emma Gabe is a PhD candidate at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto. She studies laysisters in late-medieval female monasteries in German-speaking regions. Living alongside choir nuns, these women helped complete the monastery’s physical and manual work and their religious devotions were simplified. 

For The Other Sister, Gabe will research laysisters (also called converse nuns) in northern Europe from the thirteenth to eighteenth centuries. 

Dr. Isabel Harvey, Università Ca’ Foscari/GRHS-UQAM.
Co-Investigator of the Other Sister’s Project.

Isabel Harvey is postdoctoral fellow in Early Modern Italian History at the Department of Humanistic Studies of the University of Venice Ca’ Foscari and member of the Groupe de Recherche en Histoire des Sociabilités (GRHS) of the UQAM. Her current research project, entitled “The Via Flaminia and the Pontifical States of Clement VIII: Territories, Networks and People,” focuses on the reconstruction of communication mechanisms and networks between the people and the Holy See along the Via Flaminia, and more broadly in the context of the Papal States of Clement VIII (1592-1605). Her main areas of research include the early modern Catholic Church, women religious life and local history of Papal States. 

For this project, Dr. Harvey will work on non-cloistered religious women from early modern Papal States – especially the cases of the little cities of the Marche and Umbria – and Naples – the Dominican Third Order. 

Gustave Ineza, University of St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto.
Research Assistant of the Other Sister’s Project.

Gustave Ineza is a PhD Candidate at the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto. He is a member of the Order of Preachers, also known as Dominican friars. He started studying Christian-Muslim relations at Blackfriars Hall/University of Oxford in 2011. His current research includes the study of colonial influences on Christian-Muslim relations in formerly colonized African countries. He is working on The Evolution of Christian-Muslim relations in Rwanda, from the Belgian Colonial Period to the post-genocide era. This historical assessment aims to demonstrate that interfaith relations are not static but depend on various forces, including non-theological ones. 

For the Other Sister Project, Ineza will focus on the beguines and tertiaries.

Meghan Lescault, Department of History, University of Toronto.
Member and research assistant of the Other Sister’s Project.

Meghan Lescault is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. She is writing her dissertation on the topic of secular canonesses in the Southern Low Countries (modern-day Belgium) from 1200 to 1600. These women have often been neglected in the religious historiography partly due to tradition that imposes a monastic model on female religious life. Lescault seeks to give the canonesses their proper place in the historical record by studying them as non-cloistered women.

For the Other Sisters project, Lescault is focusing on secular canonesses throughout Europe from 1100 to 1800.

Laura Moncion, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto.
Member and research assistant of the Other Sister’s Project.

Laura Moncion is a PhD Candidate at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, Canada. She is working on a dissertation on late-medieval women recluses in German-speaking towns, under the direction of Isabelle Cochelin and Shami Ghosh. Her work has been published in postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studiesImaginations: Revue d’études interculturelles de l’image/Journal of Cross-Cultural Image Studies, the Heythrop Journal, and the Global Medieval Sourcebook

As part of The Other Sister project, Moncion will focus on the longue durée and global history of religious reclusion, asking whether and how this phenomenon can be observed in contexts beyond medieval Europe, and furthermore how gender factors into this practice.

Prof. Alison More, University of St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto.
Co-Investigator of the Other Sister’s Project.

Alison More is an Assistant Professor of Medieval Studies and the inaugural holder of the Comper Professorship in Medieval Studies at the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto. Her research investigates the intersections between social and religious culture in Northern Europe from 1250 to 1450. She is primarily is interested in women’s experiences, as well as alternative interpretations of absences and inconsistencies in the historical record. Her publications include Fictive Orders and Feminine Religious Identities (OUP, 2018)

For the Other Sister, Prof. More plans to focus on the roles that women commonly known as beguines and tertiaries held in the cities of the southern Low Countries during the later medieval and early modern period. She is also planning to do some further work of the Grey Sisters, and other women who worked in hospitals. 

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search